LeanAgileUS 2019

February 25 | Signature Grand | Fort Lauderdale, FL
About LeanAgileUS 2019

Based in sunny Fort Lauderdale, LeanAgileUS 2019 brings together some of the most renowned thought leaders in the Agile and Lean North American communities. Excellian Trent Hone will present, "Growing the Garden: Fostering Self-Organized Scaling," wherein he will discuss creating and sustaining self-organizing teams that thrive. Click here to see a preview of Trent's presentation

Conference Website
https://leanagileus.com
Conference Location

6900 FL-84

Davie, FL 33317

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Here's what we are talking about!
Growing the Garden: Fostering Self-Organized Scaling
By Trent Hone
Growing the Garden: Fostering Self-Organized Scaling
By Trent Hone
Presentation time
February 26th
2:10p.m.
Register Now!

​I’m passionate about applying concepts from Complex Systems Theory (as developed by Dave Snowden, Alicia Juarrero, Bob Artigiani, etc.) to the work of software teams. My colleagues and I at Excella have been trying to exploit these ideas by using a variety of patterns borrowed from different theories and frameworks to allow our teams to grow like healthy plants in a garden. From Large-Scale Scrum (LeSS) we leverage the concepts of a single product backlog and a shared cadence. Kanban principles of visualizing the work and limiting WIP help align the teams and foster greater collaboration. Dave Snowden’s emphasis on Homo Narrans—the human as storyteller—has provided a framework for clarifying and promulgating common values, which are essential for decentralized decision-making. Collectively, these mental models created an environment that helped us scale one of our engagements from three teams to eight over the course of a single year.


The talk has the following learning outcomes: - What is a constraint? - How do effective constraints foster self-organization? - How do ineffective ones inhibit it? - Why are constraints important for scaling Agile beyond the team level? - How can you use experimentation to discover constraints within your context and foster self-organized scaling?
These concepts are valuable for team members, coaches, managers, and team members interested in learning more about how to apply the principles of self-organization to scaling. I’ll describe the theories behind the approach, the pitfalls we’ve suffered, and how we’ve probed the boundaries to continually improve. Attendees will leave with a better sense of how to foster self-organization between and among their teams.

Growing the Garden: Fostering Self-Organized Scaling
By Trent Hone

​I’m passionate about applying concepts from Complex Systems Theory (as developed by Dave Snowden, Alicia Juarrero, Bob Artigiani, etc.) to the work of software teams. My colleagues and I at Excella have been trying to exploit these ideas by using a variety of patterns borrowed from different theories and frameworks to allow our teams to grow like healthy plants in a garden. From Large-Scale Scrum (LeSS) we leverage the concepts of a single product backlog and a shared cadence. Kanban principles of visualizing the work and limiting WIP help align the teams and foster greater collaboration. Dave Snowden’s emphasis on Homo Narrans—the human as storyteller—has provided a framework for clarifying and promulgating common values, which are essential for decentralized decision-making. Collectively, these mental models created an environment that helped us scale one of our engagements from three teams to eight over the course of a single year.


The talk has the following learning outcomes: - What is a constraint? - How do effective constraints foster self-organization? - How do ineffective ones inhibit it? - Why are constraints important for scaling Agile beyond the team level? - How can you use experimentation to discover constraints within your context and foster self-organized scaling?
These concepts are valuable for team members, coaches, managers, and team members interested in learning more about how to apply the principles of self-organization to scaling. I’ll describe the theories behind the approach, the pitfalls we’ve suffered, and how we’ve probed the boundaries to continually improve. Attendees will leave with a better sense of how to foster self-organization between and among their teams.