LeanAgileUS 2020

February 24-26 | Signature Grand | Fort Lauderdale, FL
About LeanAgileUS 2020

LeanAgileUS is the premier conference for Lean and Agile discussion in North America.  Nowhere else can you find this unique blend of all flavours of Agile.  Come join us to hear world-class speakers, engage with great people and share ideas with some of the best agile minds in the world.  

Oh, and by the way, did we mention the weather?​

Conference Website
https://leanagileus.com/
Conference Location

6900 FL-84

Davie, FL 33317

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Here's what we are talking about!
Long Walks, Horseshoes and Train Rides: Leadership Lessons from Adm...
By Trent Hone
Thrive, Survive, or Die: An Adventure into the Kanban Cadences
By Trent Hone
Responding to Change Over Following a Plan: Agile Lessons from Anta...
By Julie Wyman
Long Walks, Horseshoes and Train Rides: Leadership Lessons from Admiral Nimitz
By Trent Hone
Presentation time
February 24th
12:00p.m.
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Admiral Chester Nimitz was successful while embracing a leadership approach that is unusual today. While leading the Pacific Theater of Operations and commanding the Pacific Fleet during World War II, he leveraged a series of techniques that are as relevant today as they are uncommon. I'll describe these in detail, explain why they were effective, and offer suggestions for how you can employ them in your organization.

Broad Experience: Nimitz held a wide variety of positions throughout his career. This gave him deep knowledge in specific areas. It also taught him to value expertise and respect the limits of his own knowledge. He used that respect to delegate effectively. At the same time, the diversity of his own experiences allowed him to look at challenges and opportunities in new and creative ways. David Epstein has discussed the value of this in his book, Range. I'll explain how Nimitz's career reflects those ideas.

Commitment to Growth: Nimitz fostered the development of his organizations throughout his career, whether they were on small boats in the Philippines, large cruisers in China, or a fleet making its way across the Pacific. He found ways to connect his subordinates together to build resilient networks that not only communicated new information, but effectively changed behavior. Damon Centola has hit on the essence of this in his book, How Behavior Spreads.

Skilled Use of Slack: Nimitz deliberately created slack and downtime within his schedule. He went on long walks with subordinates. He played horseshoes on a regular basis. He took slower, more relaxing transportation. This was deliberate. Nimitz created sufficient space between him and everyday problems so that he could synthesize all available information and act on it strategically. Tom DeMarco's book, Slack, describes the importance of this. I'll explain how it played out for Nimitz.

Respect for People: Nimitz understood that the key to an effective, learning organization was its people and he showed them the necessary respect. In the words of Amy Edmondson, Nimitz created an atmosphere of psychological safety, where opinions could be shared frankly, and the best acted upon. I'll relate her work, and her book, The Fearless Organization, to Nimitz's approach.

Thrive, Survive, or Die: An Adventure into the Kanban Cadences
By Trent Hone
Presentation time
February 24th
3:00p.m.
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Welcome to Ultimate Baskets! You'll be taken on a highly interactive journey through the evolution of our company as we progress through a challenging time. In this workshop, you'll become familiar with the learning loops of the Kanban Cadences and use them to manage projects, address risks, and foster innovation. Are you good enough to thrive or will you just survive? Hopefully, you won't drive us to extinction.

During this interactive workshop, you'll be exposed to a rich narrative, important metrics, and valuable data points. You will use this information make a series of decisions in Operations Reviews and the Risk Reviews, two of the most powerful Kanban Cadences. Those decisions will ”hopefully” foster the growth of Ultimate Baskets over four exciting months. Make investments, initiate new projects, address critical risks, and see if you can help our company achieve a dominant "thriving" position in the marketplace.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Become familiar with how to use various Agile metrics for important business decisions.
  • Learn how to use cadenced feedback loops to promote Business Agility.
  • Gain exposure to system thinking concepts and their importance to Business Agility.
  • Learn about different levels of decision-making (the enterprise, program, and project level) and the impact decisions at different levels have on an organization.
  • Discover how the Kanban Cadences can support a modern networked service-based organization.
Responding to Change Over Following a Plan: Agile Lessons from Antarctica
By Julie Wyman
Presentation time
February 24th
10:10a.m.
Register Now!

I spent January 2018 in Antarctica hanging out with penguins, whales, and seals. It was about as different from my day-to-day work as can be. And yet, on my long flight home, I couldn’t help but reflect on how well my trip aligned with one specific value of the Agile Manifesto: “Responding to change over following a plan.”

It’s a common misconception that there’s no need to plan in Agile. While this isn’t the case, specific approaches to planning do change—from big upfront design to a “just enough” approach. The act of planning still has great value when it occurs at the right level, but in Agile we accept that many things will change and we’ll need to remain flexible to respond to them. If we’ve planned well, we’ll go into those changes with a clear sense of our goal and how to still achieve it under the new circumstances.

Nowhere is this truer than in Antarctica. In this session, I’ll share how my trip to Antarctica drove home why we need both planning AND, even more importantly, the ability to respond to change and and not just in software development. And after being stuck in Antarctica six days longer than planned, I also traveled home with much more empathy for team members struggling with dynamic situations!

Long Walks, Horseshoes and Train Rides: Leadership Lessons from Adm...
By Trent Hone

Admiral Chester Nimitz was successful while embracing a leadership approach that is unusual today. While leading the Pacific Theater of Operations and commanding the Pacific Fleet during World War II, he leveraged a series of techniques that are as relevant today as they are uncommon. I'll describe these in detail, explain why they were effective, and offer suggestions for how you can employ them in your organization.

Broad Experience: Nimitz held a wide variety of positions throughout his career. This gave him deep knowledge in specific areas. It also taught him to value expertise and respect the limits of his own knowledge. He used that respect to delegate effectively. At the same time, the diversity of his own experiences allowed him to look at challenges and opportunities in new and creative ways. David Epstein has discussed the value of this in his book, Range. I'll explain how Nimitz's career reflects those ideas.

Commitment to Growth: Nimitz fostered the development of his organizations throughout his career, whether they were on small boats in the Philippines, large cruisers in China, or a fleet making its way across the Pacific. He found ways to connect his subordinates together to build resilient networks that not only communicated new information, but effectively changed behavior. Damon Centola has hit on the essence of this in his book, How Behavior Spreads.

Skilled Use of Slack: Nimitz deliberately created slack and downtime within his schedule. He went on long walks with subordinates. He played horseshoes on a regular basis. He took slower, more relaxing transportation. This was deliberate. Nimitz created sufficient space between him and everyday problems so that he could synthesize all available information and act on it strategically. Tom DeMarco's book, Slack, describes the importance of this. I'll explain how it played out for Nimitz.

Respect for People: Nimitz understood that the key to an effective, learning organization was its people and he showed them the necessary respect. In the words of Amy Edmondson, Nimitz created an atmosphere of psychological safety, where opinions could be shared frankly, and the best acted upon. I'll relate her work, and her book, The Fearless Organization, to Nimitz's approach.

Thrive, Survive, or Die: An Adventure into the Kanban Cadences
By Trent Hone

Welcome to Ultimate Baskets! You'll be taken on a highly interactive journey through the evolution of our company as we progress through a challenging time. In this workshop, you'll become familiar with the learning loops of the Kanban Cadences and use them to manage projects, address risks, and foster innovation. Are you good enough to thrive or will you just survive? Hopefully, you won't drive us to extinction.

During this interactive workshop, you'll be exposed to a rich narrative, important metrics, and valuable data points. You will use this information make a series of decisions in Operations Reviews and the Risk Reviews, two of the most powerful Kanban Cadences. Those decisions will ”hopefully” foster the growth of Ultimate Baskets over four exciting months. Make investments, initiate new projects, address critical risks, and see if you can help our company achieve a dominant "thriving" position in the marketplace.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Become familiar with how to use various Agile metrics for important business decisions.
  • Learn how to use cadenced feedback loops to promote Business Agility.
  • Gain exposure to system thinking concepts and their importance to Business Agility.
  • Learn about different levels of decision-making (the enterprise, program, and project level) and the impact decisions at different levels have on an organization.
  • Discover how the Kanban Cadences can support a modern networked service-based organization.
Responding to Change Over Following a Plan: Agile Lessons from Anta...
By Julie Wyman

I spent January 2018 in Antarctica hanging out with penguins, whales, and seals. It was about as different from my day-to-day work as can be. And yet, on my long flight home, I couldn’t help but reflect on how well my trip aligned with one specific value of the Agile Manifesto: “Responding to change over following a plan.”

It’s a common misconception that there’s no need to plan in Agile. While this isn’t the case, specific approaches to planning do change—from big upfront design to a “just enough” approach. The act of planning still has great value when it occurs at the right level, but in Agile we accept that many things will change and we’ll need to remain flexible to respond to them. If we’ve planned well, we’ll go into those changes with a clear sense of our goal and how to still achieve it under the new circumstances.

Nowhere is this truer than in Antarctica. In this session, I’ll share how my trip to Antarctica drove home why we need both planning AND, even more importantly, the ability to respond to change and and not just in software development. And after being stuck in Antarctica six days longer than planned, I also traveled home with much more empathy for team members struggling with dynamic situations!